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dc.contributor.authorVitzthum, Virginia J
dc.contributor.authorEllison, PT
dc.contributor.authorSukalich, S
dc.contributor.authorCáceres, E
dc.contributor.authorSpielvogel, Hilde
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-22T19:04:33Z
dc.date.available2019-07-22T19:04:33Z
dc.date.issued2000
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.umsa.bo/xmlui/handle/123456789/21950
dc.description.abstractAbstract. Fertility appears to be reduced in at least some high altitude populations relative to their counterparts at lower elevations. Inferring from the difficulties with reproduction of newcomers to high altitude and from animal experiments, it has been hypothesized that this apparent reduction is the result of hypoxia acting to reduce fecundity and/or increase fetal loss. In humans, however, several behavioral as well as biological factors may affect fertility levels. These many factors have been organized by demographers into a framework of seven proximate determinants that includes fecundability (the monthly probability of conception) of which successful ovulation is one component. To test whether ovarian function is impaired in women indigenous to high altitude, we measured salivary progesterone (P) in a sample (n = 20) of Quechua women (aged 19-42 years) residing at 3100 m. It was found that mean luteal P = 179 pmol/L and mean midluteal P = 243 pmol/L, levels that fall about midway in the range of known values for several populations and are higher than some lower altitude populations. These findings suggest that hypoxia does not appear to significantly impair ovarian function in those with lifelong residence at high altitude. There are, however, several factors common to many high altitude populations that may act to reduce fecundability and fertility including intercourse patterns (affected by marriage and migration practices), prolonged lactation, dietary insufficiency, and hard labor.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherHIGH ALTITUDE MEDICINE & BIOLOGYes_ES
dc.subjectPROGESTERONAes_ES
dc.subjectFECUNDIDADes_ES
dc.subjectDETERMINANTES PRÓXIMOSes_ES
dc.subjectQUECHUASes_ES
dc.titleDoes Hypoxia impair ovarian function in Bolivian women indigenous to high altitude?es_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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